Monthly Archives: April 2018

Cardio Partners Donates AED Trainer to Local YMCA

YMCA of Middle Tennessee Gratefully Accepts New ZOLL AED Trainer from Cardio Partners

Long-time advocates for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) awareness, AED placement and training, and CPR certification, Cardio Partners recently donated a ZOLL AED PLUS Trainer to the YMCA of Middle Tennessee. The organization will use the new training device during the hands-on portion of CPR/First Aid training at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA.

“We want to make sure that the people who are getting certified are being taught with the latest training devices. It’s important to be able to hear the voice prompts because in a real rescue operation you want to make sure that you understand what the device is telling you to do,” said Cardio Partners Marketing Coordinator Sonia Thalman.

Cardio Partners receives several donation requests each month, and the company’s leadership committee considers each request carefully and makes a decision based on a variety of factors.

“We felt like donating to the YMCA of Middle Tennessee was an especially good fit, as Cardio Partners is also headquartered in Nashville. We are committed to heart health and it’s nice to be able to serve our community,” said Sonia.

What is an AED Trainer?

An AED trainer is a non-shocking device that helps instructors safely train students on the correct use of an AED in a variety of life-threatening emergency situations. Typically, these devices come with reusable, low-adhesive defibrillator pads for adults and children.

Unlike rescue AEDs, which deliver therapeutic shocks, AED trainers do not. To avoid a potentially fatal mistake and to minimize liability, do not store AED trainers or AED Training pads near your rescue-ready AED. AED trainers should be used by qualified instructors and their students.

The ZOLL AED Plus Trainer 2 allows trainers like Michelle Mattox, CPR/AED/First Aid/O2 Instructor at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA, to instruct a group of students on how to use an AED. The device features four pre-programmed rescue scenarios as well as a fully manual mode so that instructors can have full control over simulated emergencies. These devices help students practice CPR and defibrillation in real-life situations. After training, students should be able to successfully simulate rescuing the victim of cardiac arrest with the training AED. They should also understand the difference between a trainer and a rescue AED and the basic functions of a rescue AED.

Each year, Michelle certifies approximately 200 YMCA employees and community members. At a recent Saturday CPR/First Aid training, Michelle apologized for the state of her much-used device. The decade-old training unit had become little more than a prop, as the unit no longer gave audible prompts for users, nor could Michelle use the unit to simulate different rescue scenarios.

“This is a problem,” said Michelle in a recent phone conversation “because you need to know what to expect in the real world. If you can’t hear the trainer AED, it makes teaching much more difficult. It’s also harder for students to feel confident about their ability to use an AED. I’m just so excited to have the new unit! It’s loud — and it’s supposed to be loud! It’s going to make the training more realistic. I’m so grateful!”

Features of the ZOLL AED PLUS Trainer

The latest ZOLL Trainer includes controls that simulate voice and text prompts issued by the ZOLL AED Plus when when rescuers perform CPR. The trainer also features a metronome to to help students maintain a steady compression rhythm. Instructors can press the “push harder” button from a handheld remote when a student’s chest compressions are too shallow. Instructors can also select the “good compressions” button to provide positive feedback.

The trainer is programmed with four scenarios, each simulating a different heart rhythm. Instructors can also opt to use the manual function to customize scenarios.

To learn more about AED training devices or to submit a donation request, contact Cardio Partners or AED.com at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

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What Will I Learn From a CPR or First Aid Class?

What to Expect from Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and First Aid Certification Courses

In this post we’ll preview some of the topics commonly covered, so you’ll know what to look forward to when you take the CPR/First Aid plunge. Depending on the course you take, you’ll learn CPR skills (which covers CPR for all ages, AED & choking), CPR for adults, and/or CPR for children. First Aid covers common scenarios including: bleeding, burns, poisoning, shock, and respiratory emergencies.

We’ll break it down for you in more detail, but in a nutshell, you’ll leave your CPR and First Aid classes with the knowledge, skills, experience, and confidence you need to help save a life.

Knowledge: What You Need to Know About CPR and First Aid

Today, many courses are “blended,” which means a substantial portion of the instruction occurs online. However, traditional, instructor-led training which allows participants to complete the coursework in one setting may is also available for large groups or corporate settings. Either way, once you’ve completed the required lessons and passed the accompanying skills, you’ll complete your certification with hands-on, in-person training.

Topics include how to identify sudden cardiac arrest, understanding the links in the chain of survival; the qualities of high performance CPR; the importance of personal safety and standard precautions; the steps to assess an unresponsive person; how to use an AED on an adult, child, or infant; how to place an unresponsive but breathing person in the recovery position; and how to recognize and provide treatment for a choking adult, child, or infant.  

As part of your First Aid Certification, you’ll first learn what your role as a provider is. As with CPR training, you’ll also learn how to recognize an emergency, why it’s important to offer to help, how to move an injured person safely and effectively, and the importance of standard precautions and protective barriers. You’ll also learn how to conduct primary assessments on responsive and unresponsive individuals which will, in turn, help you determine the best form of treatment.  

Skills: What You Need to Do as a CPR or First Aid Provider

Once you’ve acquired some basic CPR and First Aid knowledge, you’ll dive into the specific skills needed to perform both CPR and First Aid.

You’ll learn to perform one-person CPR, CPR with rescue breaths, Hands Only CPR, how to administer CPR as part of a 2 rescuer team, and how to administer a shock from an AED. You’ll also learn how to perform CPR on adults, children, and infants. It’s worth noting that CPR-only courses may cover adults only or infants and children. Be sure to sign up for the course that’s right for you!

Your First Aid course work will cover how to control bleeding; what to do in the event of a head, neck or back injury; how to assess and treat injuries to limbs; how to respond to burns; how to treat minor injuries; how to identify and assess altered mental status; what to do in the event someone is experiencing breathing difficulty or shortness of breath; how to respond to chest pain, severe pressure, or chest discomfort; best steps for treating a victim of poisoning; and how to respond to environmental emergencies such as hypothermia or heat stroke.

Experience: Putting CPR and First Aid Lessons into Practice

Textbook, classroom, and online learning is great, but there’s nothing like hands-on training to reinforce your coursework. As part of your CPR training, you’ll have the opportunity to practice CPR with rescue breathing, AED use, and working as part of a 2 rescuer team.

Your instructor will also review your First Aid knowledge, taking you through the steps you’ve already learned to control bleeding, Epi Pen use, patient assessment, and more.

Confidence: Being Ready to Help (While Understanding Your Limitations)

Although you’ll gain the knowledge, skills, and experience you need to help someone in need, you’ll also learn about your boundaries and the limits of your abilities. Knowing what you can and cannot do is a huge part of building confidence. As a CPR/First Aid provider, your job is to help someone who is ill and injured and to keep them safe until more advanced medical treatment arrives. That’s it!

As an authorized Training Center, Cardio Partners provides high quality and consistent training courses across the United States. Our courses are offered through the American Red Cross and the American Heart Association. For more information about blended or traditional CPR and First Aid training, call our team at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

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Your Reasons for Not Learning CPR Probably Aren’t Valid

Getting Your CPR and First Aid Certification is Easier than You Think

As a young athlete, I looked on anxiously as my coach responded confidently and calmly when a teammate collapsed from heat exhaustion and dehydration. I watched my mother howl in pain after being shot in the toe by a reveler’s stray New Year’s Eve bullet (true story). Although I had no real clue how to perform it, I steeled myself for the Heimlich when I watched my daughter inhale her first fish taco at an unsightly speed.

Over the years, I’ve stanched countless bloody noses and assessed minor sprains and major bruises, each time wondering, “Am I doing this correctly?”

Still, to my embarrassment, I never managed to take the plunge and sign up for a CPR and First Aid class.

If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably thought about getting your CPR and First Aid certifications but just never quite got around to it. Recently, however, I started writing for Cardio Partners. Over the past few months I’ve written posts with titles like “10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR” and “The Importance of CPR and AEDs: A Survivor’s Story” and found myself feeling increasingly unqualified to encourage others to sign up for CPR when I, myself, had yet to get certified.

So I decided to do something about it. A couple of weeks ago, I found myself as the lone writer in a small group of amiable YMCA of Middle Tennessee employees, compressing a steady rhythm on the chest of a well-used CPR manikin as my partners held the oxygen mask over its face, counted to 30, delivered rescue breaths, and prepared the AED to administer its life-saving shock.

Two and a half hours later, I was the proud holder of Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Basic First Aid, and Emergency Oxygen certification cards.

I Don’t Have the Time to Take a CPR Class!

Sound familiar? After discovering that “blended” classes incorporating online training with in-person live skills sessions were offered at my local Y, I realized that my biggest excuse was no longer valid.

Within moments of registering for the course, I received an email from the instructor with a link to the online portion of the course. Initially, I was a bit daunted by the sheer number of lessons required — I opted to become certified not only in CPR/AED, but also in Basic First Aid and Emergency Oxygen administration and had 46 lessons to complete and 3 exams to pass.

I soon discovered, however, that the lessons were short, easy-to-follow, and well-constructed.

Each lesson built nicely upon the one that preceded it and I found myself well-prepared to ace each of the three online exams.

Conveniently, I was able to complete the course in stages and at my own pace. Although it took me five days and a total of four hours to complete, I’m sure that quicker studies than myself could do so in a single session in as little as three hours.

I’m Waaaay Too Squeamish to Take a First Aid Course!

Yup. That’s me. I’m the person in the movie theater who covers her eyes and plugs her ears and whispers, “Is it over yet? Can I look?”

If I survived, you’re going to be just fine.

The videos are predictably staged, the blood is clearly fake, and the burns are obviously of the latex variety. Yeah, you’ll cringe a time or two, but you’ll make it.

I’m the Last Person You’d Want Performing CPR or First Aid!

Prior to completing the course, I’d have to say that statement fit me pretty well. Now that I’m far more confident in my abilities (while still being well aware of my limitations) I’d say that you could do worse than having me by your side in an emergency.

Michelle Mattox, a CPR/AED/First Aid/O2 Instructor at the Margaret Maddox Family YMCA in Nashville has certified hundreds of people over the years and says that she’s gotten a ton of positive feedback from her students, “It’s more effective when people take an online and in-person class because they get a chance to see it, hear it, and be taught the basics at their own pace and then in the class they can really focus on their skills and getting it right. It’s easier to digest that way. Pretty much everybody that I’ve talked to tells me that they feel more confident and that they know what to do.”

CPR Training is Too Expensive!

Costs may vary from provider to provider, but let me assure you, it’s quite reasonable. I recommend checking out the American Red Cross, the American Heart Association, or your local YMCA for an affordable course near you. Or, to arrange a training for your workplace or organization, call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Char Vandermeer is a freelance copywriter based in Nashville, TN. When she’s not writing she enjoys reading, gardening, kayaking, and soaking up the sunshine with her family. 

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