Monthly Archives: July 2018

Cardio Partners Joins Forces with Operation Homefront’s Back-to-School Brigade

Cardio Partners Employees Help Stuff Back-to-School Backpacks for Fort Knox Community Schools

Back-to-School Brigade

It’s Back-to-School time! Earlier this week, nearly 50 Cardio Partners employees took a break from from promoting CPR and AED awareness and chipped in to help fill 250 backpacks for children of military families.

“This is the second time we’ve partnered with Operation Homefront,” said Cardio Partners Marketing Coordinator Sonia Thalman. “Last Christmas we had the privilege of stuffing 500 stockings for kids at Fort Campbell in Clarksville and this time around we’re helping out families based at Fort Knox in Kentucky.  

Operation Homefront is a national nonprofit that helps military families by offering critical financial assistance and programs like the Back-to-School Brigade, Star-Spangled Baby Showers, transitional homes, holiday meals, and community reintegration services.

According to USA Today, parents of elementary school students can expect to spend an average of $662 per student, and parents of high school students should be prepared to shell out an average of $1,489 per student. Considering that the salary for a newly enlisted Army private is just $19,659 (army.com), back-to-school shopping can take a toll on the family budget. Fortunately, programs like Operation Homefront’s Back-to-School Brigade help ease financial anxieties and provide stability for military families.

“Our partnership with Operation Homefront is really special,” said Sonia. “Last year we were thrilled to have an opportunity to brighten up the holidays and this year we’re so excited to make the back-to-school transition a little more joyful for the kids and less stressful for our military families. Plus, it’s also a wonderful opportunity for team building within our company.”

This year, all the backpacks were stuffed by staff members and volunteers at Cardio Partners’ Tennessee headquarters just outside of Nashville, in Brentwood, TN. The company’s remote and off-site employees assisted by writing cards and notes for each of the backpacks.

The colorful backpacks included plenty of pencils, crayons, markers, highlighters, glue sticks, notebooks, erasers, and folders for K-12 students.

2018 is the 10th consecutive year that Operation Homefront and Dollar Tree have collaborated to collect and distribute school supplies for military children through the Back-to-School Brigade.

“Last year we distributed nearly 42,000 backpacks to military children to get them ready for the upcoming school year and we look forward to another opportunity to ease the financial burdens our military families face at this time of year,” said Brig. Gen. (ret.) John I. Pray Jr., President and CEO of Operation Homefront. “By working together, we are able to accomplish our mission and help military families thrive – not simply struggle to get by – in the communities they have worked so hard to protect.”

Interesting in joining the Operation Homefront’s efforts? Find a Back-to-School Brigade volunteer event near you!

Cardio Partners is committed to raising awareness about sudden cardiac arrest and providing customized AED solutions to veterans organizations, businesses, nonprofits, community organizations, and schools. For more information about AED packages for schools or group AED and CPR training, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

 

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

What are the Differences Between Infant, Child, and Adult CPR?

Learn the Pediatric Chain of Survival and Discover the key differences between Pediatric and Adult CPR

We’re the first to admit that the idea of performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on an infant or child is pretty scary. Although all of us here at Cardio Partners hope that you’ll never be called upon to perform CPR on a child, it’s important to understand the very significant differences between the three types of CPR.

Because a child’s physiology, musculature, bone density, and strength are different from an adult’s, CPR is performed differently. In fact, if adult CPR is performed on a child, it could do more harm than good.

Pediatric Chain of Survival

Earlier this month, we discussed Why the Chain of Survival is So Important, and in this post we’ll cover not only the differences between adult and pediatric CPR, but also the differences in the Chain of Survival for adults and children.

The Pediatric Chain of Survival is a sequence of events this is most likely to save the life of a young victim of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Unlike the adult Chain of Survival, which begins with early recognition and call for emergency assistance, the pediatric Chain of Survival dictates that high-quality CPR start immediately. This is because children are more likely to suffer from SCA caused by an obstructed airway or shock, so it’s important to be able to recognize and prevent respiratory problems or cardiac arrest before they occur. Only after performing CPR for a full  two minutes should the rescuer then call 911.

The Pediatric Chain of Survival consists of:

  1. Prevention of Cardiac Arrest
  2. Early, High-Quality CPR
  3. Rapid Activation of the Emergency Response System
  4. Effective Advanced Life Support
  5. Integrated Post-Cardiac Arrest Care

(Source: American Heart Association)

An Overview of the Three Different Types of CPR

Adult CPR

If you’re ever called upon to perform CPR on an adult, call 911 immediately before starting CPR. Check for a pulse and then begin CPR with chest compressions. If you’re not CPR-certified, a 911 operator can guide you through hands-only CPR. Push hard and fast on the center of the chest at a rate of 100-120 compressions per minute. Check out our Greatest Hits to Save Lives playlist to get a sense of the rhythm.

The compression depth for adults should be at least two inches and the chest should recoil completely between compressions. If you are CPR-certified, remember to use the ratio of 30 compressions to two rescue breaths. Use an AED if one is available.

Child CPR

Pediatric resuscitation protocols apply to infants less than 1 year of age and children up to the age of puberty or those weighing less than 121 pounds (Merck Manuals).

Although CPR for children is very similar to adult CPR, rescuers should start CPR before calling 911. If you’re the only person around and you need to make a choice between starting CPR and dialing 911, go for the CPR! Typically, children are more resilient than adults and their chances of survival are much higher if you begin CPR immediately.

After two minutes of CPR with rescue breaths, call 911. Because a child’s airway is more fragile than an adult’s, use caution when providing rescue breaths and be careful not to tilt the head back too far. When providing chest compressions, use one or two hands, depending on the size of the child. The depth of compressions should be only one and a half inches. The ratio of compressions to rescue breaths, 30:2, is the same for children as for adults.

If an AED is available, apply pediatric pads and use it after five cycles of CPR.

Infant CPR

Great care should be taken when performing CPR on an infant. Although a baby’s bones are more flexible, they’re also much more delicate. First, confirm that the baby is unconscious. Do not shake the baby; instead, shout and tap or flick the soles of the infant’s feet.

As with older children, you’ll want to begin CPR on an infant before calling 911. Of course, if there’s another person at the scene, ask them to call.

Check for a pulse on the inside of the upper arm and begin CPR immediately if you’re not able to detect a pulse. When providing rescue breaths to an infant, gently tilt the head so that the baby’s nose appears to be sniffing the air — this is known as the “sniffing position.” Do not tip the head back too far! Be very gentle when providing rescue breathing; don’t use the full force of your lungs to expel air. Instead, use your cheeks and puff air into the infant’s mouth and nose.

When providing compressions, use two fingers at the center of the baby’s chest. Compressions should be about an inch and a half deep at a rate of 30 compressions to two rescue breaths.

If an AED is available, apply pediatric pads and use it after five cycles of CPR. According to the American Red Cross, you may use an AED configured for an adult if pediatric settings or pads are not available.

(Sources: American Red Cross and National CPR Association)

To learn more about our CPR and AED Training or to purchase an AED with pediatric capabilities, visit aed.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

The History of Defibrillation, Defibrillators and Portable AEDs

From dogs to tablespoons to Zolls, AEDs have come a long way

As you can tell, we’re on a bit of a history kick here at Cardio Partners and AED.com! This week we’re dialing the way-back machine to 1899 to learn more about the origins of defibrillation and the birth of AEDs. To learn more about the History of CPR, check out last week’s post!

1899: The Dog Days of Defibrillation

Defibrillation was discovered at the University of Geneva in 1899 by physiologists Jean-Louis Prevost and Frédéric Batelli. In the course of their research on ventricular fibrillation — a condition that occurs when the heart beats with rapid and erratic electrical impulses and causes the chambers in the heart to quiver ineffectively — they discovered that they could induce fibrillation in dogs and then, with an even higher jolt, defibrillate by applying high-current shocks directly to the surface of the heart.

Admittedly, this was a pretty significant discovery, but because they used a very high voltage, the poor pup’s heart was ultimately incapacitated and subsequent defibrillation theories focused more on the harmful effects of the procedure rather than the potential positive, life-saving effects we’re all familiar with today (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

1933: Self-Starter for Dead Man’s Heart

A generation later, in October of 1933, Popular Mechanics ran an article about Dr. Albert S. Hyman’s promising new invention, Hyman’s Otor.

The device was essentially a “hollow steel needle, through which a carefully insulated wire runs to the open point. Both the needle itself and its central wire are connected to the terminals of a light, spring-driven generator, provided with a current-interrupting device. This mechanism can be adjusted to give electrical impulses with the frequency of the heart-beat from infancy to old age. When the physician faces a case of heart stoppage, he inserts the needle between the first and second ribs into the right auricle of the heart, and starts the generator at the required frequency” (Source: Modern Mechanix).

The device was tested on animals and revived 14 out of 43 victims of cardiac arrest (Science Museum, London). Even though the device received positive press coverage, it was perceived as interfering with natural events and was not accepted by the medical community.

1947: What a Difference a Decade Makes…and Spoons

If you’ve been wondering where the tablespoons come in, you’re about to find out! The first successful defibrillation was reported by an American surgeon, Dr. Claude S. Beck, in 1947.

His patient, a 14-year-old boy, “tolerated the surgery well but went into cardiac arrest during closure” (Resuscitation Journal). Using a combination of direct cardiac massage, drugs, and a shock delivered by what appears to be gauze-covered spoons, the boy was successfully resuscitated (Case Western Reserve University).

1950: Zoll Begins Working on an External Pacemaker

Yes, the Zoll that we all know and love was founded by a Harvard cardiologist and an AED pioneer. “In 1952, Dr. Zoll and a team of other doctors in Boston applied electric charges externally to the chest to resuscitate two patients whose hearts had stopped. The first patient lived only 20 minutes. The second patient survived for 11 months, after 52 hours of electrical stimulation” (New York Times).

1965: Defibrillators Go Mobile

In 1965, a professor from Northern Ireland, Frank Pantridge, invented the world’s first portable defibrillator. Known as  “the father of emergency medicine,” Pantridge’s device relied on a car battery for current. The 150 pound device was installed in an ambulance and was first used in 1966 (BBC News).

1972: LBJ is Saved Today

In 1972, when President Lyndon B. Johnson suffered a massive heart attack at his daughter’s Virginia home, he was revived by a portable defibrillator.

“Dr. Richard S. Crampton of the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville, who rushed a mobile coronary care unit to former President Lyndon B. Johnson…said in an interview: ‘It has tremendous potential application. Conceptually, this ought to be on every plane, train, bus, at stations and at airports, in case someone suddenly collapses. It’s like a fire extinguisher; you just hang it on the wall and you go put out the fire, which happens to be ventricular fibrillation’” (New York Times).

2018: Where We Are With AEDs Now

Today, portable AEDs are so easy to use that many states require their placement in schools, sports arenas, airports, health clubs, casinos, and other public places. Portable AEDs are also available for home use.

Unlike professor Pantridge’s “portable” defibrillator, modern AEDs typically weigh approximately 3 pounds and are fully automated.

For the full scoop on CPR or AEDs, CPR and AED Training, or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post