Category Archives: AED Awareness

Top 10 Questions About AEDs

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About AEDs

1. What is an AED?

AED stands for Automated External Defibrillator.

2. What Does an AED Do?

An AED is a portable device that delivers a life-saving shock to a heart that is experiencing fibrillation. An AED automatically analyzes and measure an unresponsive person’s heart rhythm. If the heart is experiencing fibrillation and a shock is deemed necessary, an AED will deliver a shock to restart the heart or to restore the heart to the correct rhythm. The AED will first analyze the victim’s heart rhythm, and then audio or text prompts will tell the rescuer how to proceed. If defibrillation is necessary, the device will warn responders to stay clear of the victim while the shock is delivered. If CPR is indicated, the AED will instruct the rescuer to continue performing CPR.

For more information about how an AED works, check out our post, (Almost) Everything You Need to Know About CPR and AEDs.

3. What is Defibrillation?

Believe it or not, defibrillation was discovered at the University of Geneva in 1899 by physiologists Jean-Louis Prevost and Frédéric Batelli. Ventricular fibrillation is a condition that occurs when the heart beats rapidly and erratically. The History of Defibrillation, Defibrillators, and Portable AEDs is a must-read if you’re as fascinated by the subject as we are.

4. Do I Really Need an AED?

Six Shocking Statistics About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and AEDs answers this question pretty thoroughly, but 68.5% of the 456,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home. In other words, if you have an AED, the life you save will likely be that of a loved one.

5. Do I Need to Have Special Training to Use an AED?

Nope. While we encourage everyone to gain the confidence they need through CPR, First Aid, and AED certification courses, multilingual voice and text prompts ensure that everyone can become a lifesaver.

6. Can I Harm Someone By Using an AED?

An AED is designed to be used on someone who is experiencing cardiac arrest. It may be an individual’s best chance at survival. Thanks to built-in sensors and safety features, AEDs will not deliver unnecessary shocks.

7. Can I Use an AED on an Infant?

Yes, it’s safe to use an AED on infants and children. Although AEDs are manufactured with adults in mind, most AEDs come equipped with pediatric settings and/or pediatric pads that adjust the energy level used. These settings make them safe for use on young children who weigh less than 55 pounds. The American Heart Association recommends that pediatric attenuated pads should be used on children under the age of eight and on infants. Adult pads are used on children eight years and older. However, if pediatric pads and settings are not available, the American Red Cross suggests that an AED with adult pads should be used.

8. Can an AED be Used on a Pregnant Woman? 

Cardiac arrest can happen to anyone at any time. If a pregnant woman goes into cardiac arrest, call 911 and tell the operator that the victim is pregnant. This will help alert EMS providers so they’re prepared upon arrival and can transport the woman to a hospital that can perform an emergency C-section, if necessary.

Next, start CPR with chest compressions as you would for an individual who is not pregnant. It is vitally important to keep blood and oxygen moving throughout the body. According to the American Heart Association, it is safe to use an AED if one is available.

9. Do AEDs Expire?

Although AEDs don’t expire, batteries and pads do. The importance of AED preventative maintenance and service cannot be overstated. We recommend AED owners invest in both preventative maintenance and compliance management programs to ensure their AEDs are fully operational and in compliance with local laws.

10. Where’s the Best Place to Keep My AED?

If you own an AED it needs to be publicly accessible and in plain sight. An AED can’t save a life if it can’t be found. For more information, read our AED placement guide: Finding the Best Location for Your AED

Ready to schedule CPR and AED training for your team? Or perhaps it’s time to invest in LifeShield AED Compliance Management to ensure that your AED is good to go. For AED solutions, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs are intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.

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The 2018 Cardio Partners Gift Guide & Holiday Sale

Looking for the perfect gift for the life-saver in your family? You’ve come to the right place.

 

Happy Holidays from all of us here at Cardio Partners and AED.com! To celebrate, we’ve come up with a few unique gift ideas for the heart- and safety-conscious souls in your family.

Use the discount code HOLIDAY2018 at checkout to get 10% off your entire AED.com or Cardio Partners purchase.

For the On-the-Go Professional: Curaplex Pocket Mask with O2 Inlet

The Curaplex Pocket Mask with O2 Inlet is the perfect stocking stuffer for teachers, office managers, consultants, fitness instructors, and facilities managers, or just about anyone who is CPR-certified! This affordable, compact mask is suitable for use on adults, children, and infants and features a disposable one-way valve with a 3M Filtrete hydrophobic filter to help prevent the transmission of liquids and other secretions. The oxygen inlet facilitates the delivery of oxygen to breathing and non-breathing individuals. The pre-inflated cuff makes for quick and easy application and the compact carrying case keeps your mask in perfect working condition.

For the Always Prepared: Curaplex Stop the Bleed Kits

Earlier this year, our good friends at the Brentwood Fire and Rescue Department led a hands-on Stop the Bleed training at our offices just outside of Nashville. Since then, we’ve been huge proponents of these supplemental training programs, and we are pleased to offer Curaplex Stop the Bleed kits start at just $59.99. These compact kits are designed to provide a rescuer (whether a  civilian bystander or a first responder) with immediate access to life-saving products that can control bleeding and traumatic hemorrhaging.


These vacuum-packed and tamper-proof kits include:

  • 2 rolls of primed, compressed gauze dressing
  • 1 C-A-T® tourniquet
  • 1 emergency bandage
  • 1 permanent marker
  • 2 pairs of gloves, latex-free, large
  • Pair of trauma shears, 7.5”
  • Detailed and easy-to-follow directions

Advanced kits also include 1 Pack of HALO seals and QuikClot combat gauze.

For the Life-Long Learner: CPR and First Aid Training

If you’ve always wondered what you’d learn in a CPR class, CPR and First Aid training may be the perfect gift to give to yourself! It’s also the ideal gift for all the babysitters, new parents, high school students, and teachers on your list. Need some more convincing? Read our post, 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn CPR — and then sign up for a class near you!

For the Newly First Aid Certified: A Brand-New First Aid Kit

We carry a wide range of first aid kits. Our entry-level Curaplex First Aid Kit comes in a compact metal case. The case is portable or can be mounted for easy access. The kit includes one of each of the following:

  • Bandage, latex-free, 2”
  • Triangular bandage, with two pins, 36” x 51”
  • Box of adhesive bandages
  • Box of knuckle bandages
  • Gauze bandage, large, 24” x 72”
  • Roll of tape, waterproof, ½”
  • Roll of stretch gauze, 2” x 4 yd
  • Bottle of burn spray, 3 oz
  • Pair of scissors, 4-1/2”
  • Bottle of eye wash, 4 oz
  • Box of antiseptic wipes
  • Box of ammonia inhalants
  • Cold pack
  • Metal case

For the New Recruit: The Curaplex Officer Down Kit

The Curaplex Officer Down Individual First Aid Kits (IFAK) are designed for law enforcement officers, first responders, or members of the military. These highly portable individual trauma kits contain the essential supplies needed to treat life-threatening traumatic injuries — such as gunshot wounds or stab wounds — that occur in the field or in a combat environment.

For the Cardiac Arrest Survivor: An AED for the Home

If you’re looking a unique gift for your loved one, an automated external defibrillator is just the ticket. There are a lot of things to consider when purchasing an AED, so we recommend reading our post, Which AED is Right for You, or downloading our AED Starter’s Guide before making a decision. As of publication, our recertified Cardiac Science Powerheart G3 Plus was listed at $599, and we invite you to call us for pricing on our recertified HeartSine Samaritan PAD 300P (supplies are limited).

For our full line up of AEDs, CPR and AED Training, AED Accessories & Storage, and AED Services, call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Don’t forget to enter the discount code HOLIDAY2018 and save 10% off your entire order! Offer expires on December 31, 2018.

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California Enacts New AED Legislation

New Laws Mandate AEDs at Public Swimming Pools, Schools and More

California AED Laws

Legislators across the country appear to have AEDs on their minds, and they continue to develop legislation to ensure that their constituents have access to life-saving technology in public places. In May, Tennessee enacted legislation requiring AEDs in schools and requiring teachers to have AED training. Late last month, California amended existing AED laws and joined Maryland, New Jersey, and Oregon in requiring AEDs at public swimming pools.

AEDs Required at California Swimming Pools

The law, which was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown on September 6, 2018, is summarized in the official Legislative Counsel’s Digest as follows, “This bill would require those public swimming pools, as defined, that are required to provide lifeguard services and that charge a direct fee to additionally provide an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) during pool operations, as specified. Because the failure to comply with these provisions would be a crime, the bill would create a state-mandated local program. The bill would also require the State Department of Education, in consultation with the State Department of Public Health, to issue best practices guidelines related to pool safety at K–12 schools, as specified.”

Assembly Bill 2009 Requires AEDs at Interscholastic Athletic Programs

Joining 17 other states that have enacted some form of AED legislation pertaining to schools, California now requires school districts’ public and charter schools that offer interscholastic athletic programs to:

  • Put an emergency action plan in place addressing, among other things, sudden cardiac arrest emergencies.
  • Acquire at least one AED for each public or charter school in the district (effective July 1, 2019) to be available on campus.
  • Encourage that AEDs be made available for use within 3-5 minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.
  • Ensure AEDs are made available to athletic trainers and coaches and other authorized individuals at athletic programs, on-campus activities, and events.
  • Ensure AEDs are properly inspected and maintained.

 

Fatal Heart Attack on Metrolink Prompts Changes to AED Laws

In August 2017, a man collapsed and died on an LA-bound Metrolink train. According to the LA Times, passengers performed CPR and called 911, but without an AED on board, they were unable to provide additional assistance. By the time the train arrived at Union Station, more than 30 minutes after the passenger had collapsed, it was too late.

 

Senate Bill 502, enacted on September 20, now requires public entities operating certain commuter rail systems to have an AED on board each train on or before July  1, 2020. Training of employees on AED use is encouraged, but not required.

New Construction, Renovations, and Tenant-improved Buildings Now Need an AED

Existing California laws mandated the placement of AEDs in certain newly constructed buildings with an occupancy of more than 200. This new addendum now requires “…certain occupied structures that are not owned or operated by any local government entity and are constructed on or after January 1, 2017, to have an automated external defibrillator (AED) on the premises. This bill would apply the AED requirements to certain structures that are constructed prior to January 1, 2017, and subject to subsequent modifications, renovations, or tenant improvements, as specified.”

A Summary of California’s AED Statutes

  • Any person who, in good faith and not for compensation, renders emergency care or treatment by the use of an AED at the scene of an emergency is not liable for any civil damages resulting from any acts or omissions in rendering the emergency care.
  • AED registration is required.
  • AEDs should be maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.
  • AED should be tested at least biannually and after each use.
  • When an AED is placed in a building, the building owner shall, at least once a year, notify the tenants as to the location of the AED units and provide information to tenants about who they can contact if they want to voluntarily take AED or CPR training.
  • Instructions for AED use should be posted in 14 point type next to the device.
  • AEDs are required in health studios and fitness centers.
  • AEDs are required in assembly buildings with an occupancy of greater than 300; business buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; educational buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; factory buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; institutional buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; mercantile buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more; residential buildings with an occupancy of 200 or more, excluding single-family and multifamily dwelling units.
  • If the governing board of a school district or the governing body of a charter school requires a course in health education for graduation from high school, then instruction in performing compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be included in the course.
  • AEDs are required at public swimming pools.
  • Public and charter schools with interscholastic athletic programs must have AEDs.
  • Certain commuter trains must have AEDs (effective July 2020).

 

We’ll do our best to keep you up-to-date on the latest AED legislation. Subscribe to our blog for the latest AED news and updates. For more information about AED laws, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

 

Please note: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED laws in your state.

 

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