Category Archives: Zoll Medical

AED Grant Guide: Finding Funding For Your AED Program

What you need to know about grants, grant writing, and securing a grant for your AED

It’s no question that having an automated external defibrillator (AED) in your school, office, community center, or nonprofit organization could save a life. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) causes more deaths per year than breast cancer, vehicular accidents, and diabetes combined. And, did you know that for each minute defibrillation is delayed, the chance of survival drops by 10%? In fact, defibrillation is so effective that the National Safety Council estimates that wider access to AEDs could save up to 40,000 lives per year!

Unfortunately, however, the cost of these life-saving devices can be prohibitive for many organizations. At Cardio Partners and AED.com, we make it our mission to ensure that organizations that would benefit from an AED have the resources they need to find funding and implement their AED program.

In this guide, we’ll discuss the different types of grants or potential funding sources for your AED, how to effectively write a grant proposal, and share a few reputable resources to get you started!

What is a Grant?

A grant is a financial gift that is bestowed upon a nonprofit organization. Grants do not have to be repaid; however, in many instances, certain conditions must be met to ensure that the funding is being used appropriately. Typically, grant recipients have been issued 501(c)(3) status by the government. Government agencies, community organizations, and public schools are also often eligible for grants.

Where do Grants Come From?

Grants may come from a number of different sources. Federal and state governments, corporations, private trusts, private foundations, and community foundations are all common sources for grants.

What Kind of Grants are there?

Just as there are a number of different sources for grants, there are a number of different types of grants. For AED funding, common types of grants include:

  • Project-based grants: Grants that are to be used for a particular project or program.
  • Matching grants: Grants in which the applicant (grantee) pledges to raise a set amount of funds that will be matched by the donor.
  • Employee match: Companies with employee matching grant programs encourage employees to donate to a cause of their choice and the employer pledges to match their contribution.
  • In-Kind Donation: In this instance, an organization would receive an AED in lieu of a financial gift.

Grant Application Steps

Applying for a grant can be time-consuming and may involve a lot of information. To set yourself up for success you’ll want to carefully define your goals. As you do this, think about why your organization needs an AED and how it would benefit your members. Then, begin your search for potential grant sources. (Read on for our resource suggestions!)

Once you have a list of potential funders, narrow your options and make contact. If possible, meet with the funder prior to submitting your application so you have a better idea of what makes for a successful application.

As you put your proposal together, put yourself in the funder’s position and make a compelling case. Think about what they’re looking for in an organization and emphasize those aspects of your work. You may also want to consider how you can help the funder. As you prepare your statement, explain why your proposed AED program is so important and why your organization is a good fit for an AED program in your community. Be positive and emphasize the impact their donation could have.

Carefully follow all grant application steps. You’ll need to answer each question on the application clearly and with great care. Be prepared to provide organizational data, bios of your key employees, financial statements, and data about the communities you serve. Deadlines matter! If you submit an application after the deadline, your organization will very likely miss out on funding!

If you’re selected to receive a grant, make sure you understand the reporting requirements and any specific grant acknowledgment procedures the funder may expect. While we’re on the subject of follow-up, don’t forget to express your gratitude to the funder!

Because many different organizations may be competing for the same grant, your application may not be selected. If possible and if appropriate, follow up with the funder to discover what you could improve on and put their insights to good use on your next application!

A Word of Warning: AED Grant Scams

As you search for potential AED grants, be aware that some websites may offer what they refer to as a “grant” or “partial discount.” In some instances, these “offers” may be less-than-reputable attempts at offering minimal discounts or outright scams. If you see an offer for a price-reduction “grant” or “discounted” price, be sure to check on the actual retail price of the AED.

Manufacturer pricing can be found on Cardio Partners and the AED.com websites for accurate comparisons. We’re also happy to work with deserving organizations to make sure they receive the best possible equipment pricing.

AED Grant Resources and Sources

In many instances, grant research can be conducted online. You may want to visit your local library branch to see if they have a development professional who can assist you or subscriptions to databases like the Foundation Directory Online. You may also want to approach your local civic organizations such as the American Legion, Elks Club, Kiwanis Club, Lions, or Rotary Club may be willing to fund your program.

GotAED, an initiative of Simon’s Heart, is a crowdfunding site dedicated to placing AEDs in areas where children learn and play. The site invites schools and youth organizations to begin a campaign to fund the purchase of an AED and offers tips and suggestions to help ensure a successful crowdsourcing campaign. Community members, friends, and generous benefactors make it possible for these life-saving devices to be placed where they’re most need.

Although funders and funding opportunities change frequently, here are a few additional resources to get you started.

The Foundation Center

Defibtech Grant Assistance Program

Zoll Grant Assistance

Nothing makes us happier than donating an AED to a deserving organization. We make every attempt to honor donation requests; unfortunately, however, we receive far more requests that we can reasonably accommodate. For more information about our donation program, please contact us, we’d love to hear from you. Call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

The History of Defibrillation, Defibrillators and Portable AEDs

From dogs to tablespoons to Zolls, AEDs have come a long way

As you can tell, we’re on a bit of a history kick here at Cardio Partners and AED.com! This week we’re dialing the way-back machine to 1899 to learn more about the origins of defibrillation and the birth of AEDs. To learn more about the History of CPR, check out last week’s post!

1899: The Dog Days of Defibrillation

Defibrillation was discovered at the University of Geneva in 1899 by physiologists Jean-Louis Prevost and Frédéric Batelli. In the course of their research on ventricular fibrillation — a condition that occurs when the heart beats with rapid and erratic electrical impulses and causes the chambers in the heart to quiver ineffectively — they discovered that they could induce fibrillation in dogs and then, with an even higher jolt, defibrillate by applying high-current shocks directly to the surface of the heart.

Admittedly, this was a pretty significant discovery, but because they used a very high voltage, the poor pup’s heart was ultimately incapacitated and subsequent defibrillation theories focused more on the harmful effects of the procedure rather than the potential positive, life-saving effects we’re all familiar with today (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

1933: Self-Starter for Dead Man’s Heart

A generation later, in October of 1933, Popular Mechanics ran an article about Dr. Albert S. Hyman’s promising new invention, Hyman’s Otor.

The device was essentially a “hollow steel needle, through which a carefully insulated wire runs to the open point. Both the needle itself and its central wire are connected to the terminals of a light, spring-driven generator, provided with a current-interrupting device. This mechanism can be adjusted to give electrical impulses with the frequency of the heart-beat from infancy to old age. When the physician faces a case of heart stoppage, he inserts the needle between the first and second ribs into the right auricle of the heart, and starts the generator at the required frequency” (Source: Modern Mechanix).

The device was tested on animals and revived 14 out of 43 victims of cardiac arrest (Science Museum, London). Even though the device received positive press coverage, it was perceived as interfering with natural events and was not accepted by the medical community.

1947: What a Difference a Decade Makes…and Spoons

If you’ve been wondering where the tablespoons come in, you’re about to find out! The first successful defibrillation was reported by an American surgeon, Dr. Claude S. Beck, in 1947.

His patient, a 14-year-old boy, “tolerated the surgery well but went into cardiac arrest during closure” (Resuscitation Journal). Using a combination of direct cardiac massage, drugs, and a shock delivered by what appears to be gauze-covered spoons, the boy was successfully resuscitated (Case Western Reserve University).

1950: Zoll Begins Working on an External Pacemaker

Yes, the Zoll that we all know and love was founded by a Harvard cardiologist and an AED pioneer. “In 1952, Dr. Zoll and a team of other doctors in Boston applied electric charges externally to the chest to resuscitate two patients whose hearts had stopped. The first patient lived only 20 minutes. The second patient survived for 11 months, after 52 hours of electrical stimulation” (New York Times).

1965: Defibrillators Go Mobile

In 1965, a professor from Northern Ireland, Frank Pantridge, invented the world’s first portable defibrillator. Known as  “the father of emergency medicine,” Pantridge’s device relied on a car battery for current. The 150 pound device was installed in an ambulance and was first used in 1966 (BBC News).

1972: LBJ is Saved Today

In 1972, when President Lyndon B. Johnson suffered a massive heart attack at his daughter’s Virginia home, he was revived by a portable defibrillator.

“Dr. Richard S. Crampton of the University of Virginia Medical School in Charlottesville, who rushed a mobile coronary care unit to former President Lyndon B. Johnson…said in an interview: ‘It has tremendous potential application. Conceptually, this ought to be on every plane, train, bus, at stations and at airports, in case someone suddenly collapses. It’s like a fire extinguisher; you just hang it on the wall and you go put out the fire, which happens to be ventricular fibrillation’” (New York Times).

2018: Where We Are With AEDs Now

Today, portable AEDs are so easy to use that many states require their placement in schools, sports arenas, airports, health clubs, casinos, and other public places. Portable AEDs are also available for home use.

Unlike professor Pantridge’s “portable” defibrillator, modern AEDs typically weigh approximately 3 pounds and are fully automated.

For the full scoop on CPR or AEDs, CPR and AED Training, or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post

Texas Girl Scout Earns Prestigious Gold Award and Donates ZOLL AED Plus to City Park

Jillian Rash Donates AED to Twin Coves Park and Raises Heart Health Awareness in Flower Mound, Texas

 

Flower Mound, a close-knit community located just 20 miles northwest of Dallas, is known for its proximity to Grapevine Lake and the eponymous 12-acre hill covered in native prairie grasses and wildflowers. Now, the city has one more claim to fame: the home of newly-minted Girl Scout Gold Award recipient Jillian Rash.

For more than a year, Jillian, a junior at Flower Mound High School, worked tirelessly to increase awareness about heart disease in women and to raise enough money to donate an AED to the city’s popular Twin Coves Park.

After watching town hall meetings and discovering that there was a need for an AED at the park, Jillian set her goals and got to work.

Her incredible Girl Scout Gold Award journey concluded on March 5, 2018, when Jillian made her final heart health awareness presentation to members of City Council. Community attendees were visibly and vocally impressed by the young advocate’s hard work and by her varied efforts to raise awareness around this incredibly important issue.

Of the presentation earlier this month, Jillian says “It was really exciting. It was everything that I had worked on for the past year and a half had come to a peak. I was really proud of all that I had done. I also really enjoyed talking to all the people in the community. I had people coming up to me telling me how AEDs saved their lives. It’s just really exciting to see that my project had an impact on people and that they benefited from it. That was my goal.”

Frank Mannino, a strategic account manager for Cardio Partners, had the privilege of handing over the ZOLL AED Plus to Jillian, who then presented it to park manager Mark Long. She also was able to donate a recessed wall cabinet to help ensure visibility and public access to the life-saving device.

“Cardio Partners was really excited to help and to offer our support for such a dedicated young woman who wants to help her community,” says Mannino. “I know hundreds of people who do this for a living and I was so impressed that she volunteered to do this! Education is key, really. And she took the time to educate herself and then put in all the effort to educate other people and change her community. She’s teaching people how to react in the event of a cardiac emergency and giving individuals a chance.”

Jillian chose this ambitious project after witnessing the devastating impact of heart disease in her community and subsequently learning that heart disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. The American Heart Association notes that heart disease contributes to 1 in 3 women’s deaths each year.

“I think death from heart attacks are so preventable,” says Jillian. “If you know symptoms of a heart attack you can be proactive and go to the hospital.”

Over the course of 18 months, Jillian advocated for women’s heart health awareness and helped community members learn more about how to lead heart-healthy lives.

She created a public Gold Award Women’s Heart Health Awareness Facebook page, where she posted daily tips to help group members make heart-healthy decisions. She also hosted a fun workshop for Flower Mound elementary girls to teach them about heart health habits.

Even more significantly, in February of 2017 and 2018, Jillian hosted AED/CPR trainings and First Aid courses that resulted in the certification of nearly 100 individuals. During this time, she was also busy raising funds to purchase a new ZOLL AED Plus and to provide training to four Twin Coves Park employees.

“On behalf of the Parks and Rec Department and the Twin Coves staff, and anyone who goes into the park, we want to thank you for your efforts,” said park manager Mark Long, during his remarks at the March 3 meeting. “It would be my plea to you to become certified in the AED or CPR or basic First Aid. You never know when you’ll need to use it. And while I hope we never have to use it at Twin Coves Park, I know that because of Jillian’s efforts, we’re going to be prepared for that day.”

The Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest achievement that a Girl Scout can receive. The award recognizes girls who have demonstrated extraordinary leadership and who have identified and completed projects that have a long-lasting and sustainable impact on their local community and beyond. Over the past century, nearly 1 million dedicated and driven girls have made a lasting impact on their communities and beyond. Jillian Rash is a member of Troop 3838, led by Andie Milton.

To learn more about how Cardio Partners can help you serve your community, contact our team at 866-349-4362 or email Cardio Partners at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

Use Facebook to Comment on this Post