Tag Archives: AED Awareness

6 Shocking Statistics About Sudden Cardiac Arrest and AEDs

SCA and AEDs By the Numbers (And What We Can Do About It)

To kick off the National Sudden Cardiac Awareness month and to usher in October, we’re sharing a few spook-worthy statistics about SCA.

Shocking Stat #1: Each year, more than 356,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) occur in the United States.

Taken a step further, about 90% of the people who experience an OHCA will die. While these numbers are nothing short of staggering, The American Heart Association also notes that “CPR, especially if administered immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.”

What is CPR and how does it work? Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an easy-to-learn lifesaving procedure undertaken by first responders or bystanders in an effort to maintain the flow of oxygen to and from the brain and other vital organs. Often, artificial respiration (mouth-to-mouth or bag-valve mask ventilation) accompany manual chest compressions; however, compression-only CPR is an increasingly accepted method as well.

Let’s make a dent in the statistics! Cardio Partners offers nationwide CPR training; contact us to learn more.

Shocking Stat #2: Among middle-aged adults treated for SCA, 50% had no symptoms before the onset of arrest.

Much like SCA survivor Rob Seymour (who we profiled back in March), 50% of people who experience cardiac arrest demonstrate no warning signs.

However, when we flip that stat on its head, a whopping 50% of the people who experience SCA do exhibit warning signs in the hours, days, and weeks prior to the event, and only 19% of the symptomatic patients called emergency medical services to report their symptoms (National Center for Biotechnology Information).

Be heart-aware and be on the lookout for symptoms such as:

  • Pain or discomfort in the chest.
  • Lightheadedness, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Jaw, neck, or back pain.
  • Discomfort or pain in the arm or shoulder.
  • Shortness of breath.

Want to dig a little deeper? Read our post, “What’s the Difference Between a Heart Attack and Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

Shocking Stat #3: 475,000 Americans die from a cardiac arrest every year and 17.5 million people across the globe die from cardiovascular disease each year.

These figures, courtesy of the American Heart Association and the World Heart Federation, demonstrate just how important it is to take care of your heart! Put yet another way, in the United States, SCA claims more lives than colorectal cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, influenza, pneumonia, auto accidents, HIV, firearms, and house fires combined.

Just last week, in celebration of World Heart Day, we shared a few of our favorite heart-healthy tips!

Shocking Stat #4: 10,000 SCAs occur in the workplace each year.

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration strongly encourages the placement of AEDs in the workplace, yet no federal regulations exist.

Take a look at this example, cited on OSHA’s website: “While standing on a fire escape during a building renovation, a 30-year-old construction worker was holding a metal pipe with both hands. The pipe contacted a high voltage line, and the worker instantly collapsed. About 4 minutes later, a rescue squad arrived and began CPR. Within six minutes the squad had defibrillated the worker. His heartbeat returned to normal and he was transported to a hospital. The worker regained consciousness and was discharged from the hospital within two weeks.”

What can you do to improve SCA survival rates among your employees? Implement an AED program in your workplace today! Affordable, recertified AEDs start at just $550 and implementing an emergency response plan is priceless. Ready to take the plunge? We’ll help you figure out which AED is right for you.

Shocking Stat #5: 68.5% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home.

It should go without saying, but we’re going to go ahead and say it: saving a life is, without a doubt, the best reason for learning CPR. Because four out of five cardiac arrests occur at home, performing CPR promptly and investing in an AED for your home may save the life of someone you love.

And, in case you’re curious, 21% OHCAs occurred in public settings and 10.5% occurred in nursing homes.

Shocking Stat #6: 45% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims survive when bystander CPR is administered.

See, it’s not all bad news! Not only that, but the American Heart Association recently published an article revealing that more people are stepping up to offer CPR when someone’s heart stops.

However, despite that fact that first responders are “intervening at higher levels,” survival rates remain higher for men than for women.

One of the researchers associated with the study, Dr. Carolina Malta Hansen, a researcher at Duke Clinical Research Institute, said that a number of factors might have contributed to the outcomes. “Compared to male victims of cardiac arrests, women are more likely to have cardiomyopathy, or disease of the heart muscle, and non-shockable rhythms that can’t be treated with defibrillation. Women who suffer cardiac arrests also tend to be older than men and live at home alone, with less chance of CPR being performed.”

In the article, Hansen goes on to note that there’s a great need to strengthen all the links in the chain of survival and that “the most important thing for the general public to know is that bystander intervention is paramount. You shouldn’t be afraid of doing something wrong, because anything is better than nothing: Stepping in and starting CPR and applying an AED before EMS arrives is the foundation for survival.”

For more information about purchasing a new or recertified AED for your home or workplace, or to schedule AED training or maintenance, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. We also welcome your emails, you can reach us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

 

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AED Grant Guide: Finding Funding For Your AED Program

What you need to know about grants, grant writing, and securing a grant for your AED

It’s no question that having an automated external defibrillator (AED) in your school, office, community center, or nonprofit organization could save a life. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) causes more deaths per year than breast cancer, vehicular accidents, and diabetes combined. And, did you know that for each minute defibrillation is delayed, the chance of survival drops by 10%? In fact, defibrillation is so effective that the National Safety Council estimates that wider access to AEDs could save up to 40,000 lives per year!

Unfortunately, however, the cost of these life-saving devices can be prohibitive for many organizations. At Cardio Partners and AED.com, we make it our mission to ensure that organizations that would benefit from an AED have the resources they need to find funding and implement their AED program.

In this guide, we’ll discuss the different types of grants or potential funding sources for your AED, how to effectively write a grant proposal, and share a few reputable resources to get you started!

What is a Grant?

A grant is a financial gift that is bestowed upon a nonprofit organization. Grants do not have to be repaid; however, in many instances, certain conditions must be met to ensure that the funding is being used appropriately. Typically, grant recipients have been issued 501(c)(3) status by the government. Government agencies, community organizations, and public schools are also often eligible for grants.

Where do Grants Come From?

Grants may come from a number of different sources. Federal and state governments, corporations, private trusts, private foundations, and community foundations are all common sources for grants.

What Kind of Grants are there?

Just as there are a number of different sources for grants, there are a number of different types of grants. For AED funding, common types of grants include:

  • Project-based grants: Grants that are to be used for a particular project or program.
  • Matching grants: Grants in which the applicant (grantee) pledges to raise a set amount of funds that will be matched by the donor.
  • Employee match: Companies with employee matching grant programs encourage employees to donate to a cause of their choice and the employer pledges to match their contribution.
  • In-Kind Donation: In this instance, an organization would receive an AED in lieu of a financial gift.

Grant Application Steps

Applying for a grant can be time-consuming and may involve a lot of information. To set yourself up for success you’ll want to carefully define your goals. As you do this, think about why your organization needs an AED and how it would benefit your members. Then, begin your search for potential grant sources. (Read on for our resource suggestions!)

Once you have a list of potential funders, narrow your options and make contact. If possible, meet with the funder prior to submitting your application so you have a better idea of what makes for a successful application.

As you put your proposal together, put yourself in the funder’s position and make a compelling case. Think about what they’re looking for in an organization and emphasize those aspects of your work. You may also want to consider how you can help the funder. As you prepare your statement, explain why your proposed AED program is so important and why your organization is a good fit for an AED program in your community. Be positive and emphasize the impact their donation could have.

Carefully follow all grant application steps. You’ll need to answer each question on the application clearly and with great care. Be prepared to provide organizational data, bios of your key employees, financial statements, and data about the communities you serve. Deadlines matter! If you submit an application after the deadline, your organization will very likely miss out on funding!

If you’re selected to receive a grant, make sure you understand the reporting requirements and any specific grant acknowledgment procedures the funder may expect. While we’re on the subject of follow-up, don’t forget to express your gratitude to the funder!

Because many different organizations may be competing for the same grant, your application may not be selected. If possible and if appropriate, follow up with the funder to discover what you could improve on and put their insights to good use on your next application!

A Word of Warning: AED Grant Scams

As you search for potential AED grants, be aware that some websites may offer what they refer to as a “grant” or “partial discount.” In some instances, these “offers” may be less-than-reputable attempts at offering minimal discounts or outright scams. If you see an offer for a price-reduction “grant” or “discounted” price, be sure to check on the actual retail price of the AED.

Manufacturer pricing can be found on Cardio Partners and the AED.com websites for accurate comparisons. We’re also happy to work with deserving organizations to make sure they receive the best possible equipment pricing.

AED Grant Resources and Sources

In many instances, grant research can be conducted online. You may want to visit your local library branch to see if they have a development professional who can assist you or subscriptions to databases like the Foundation Directory Online. You may also want to approach your local civic organizations such as the American Legion, Elks Club, Kiwanis Club, Lions, or Rotary Club may be willing to fund your program.

GotAED, an initiative of Simon’s Heart, is a crowdfunding site dedicated to placing AEDs in areas where children learn and play. The site invites schools and youth organizations to begin a campaign to fund the purchase of an AED and offers tips and suggestions to help ensure a successful crowdsourcing campaign. Community members, friends, and generous benefactors make it possible for these life-saving devices to be placed where they’re most need.

Although funders and funding opportunities change frequently, here are a few additional resources to get you started.

The Foundation Center

Defibtech Grant Assistance Program

Zoll Grant Assistance

Nothing makes us happier than donating an AED to a deserving organization. We make every attempt to honor donation requests; unfortunately, however, we receive far more requests that we can reasonably accommodate. For more information about our donation program, please contact us, we’d love to hear from you. Call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362 or send an email to customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

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10 Reasons Why AED Drills Are Important in Schools

Discover why AED drills are important and learn how to run an effective drill.

AEDs can save lives, but only if educators and administrators are prepared to take action. Tornado, fire, lockdown, and even active shooter drills are the norm for most schools across the country, but when is the last time you scheduled a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA)/AED drill?

In this post, we’ll discuss the reasons why SCA/AED drills are important in schools and we’ll give you the tools you need to create an effective drill.

Why are AED Drills Important? SCA is Shockingly Common in Schools.

A couple of weeks ago, we covered the importance of AEDs in schools. However, if you’re a by-the-numbers kind of person, here are a few statistics about SCA in schools and in children under the age 18:

  1. In the United States, 1 in 25 schools experiences an SCA event each year.
  2. In 2017, 7,037 children died from cardiac arrest.
  3. Schools are community gathering places, and adults are even more likely to suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a school setting than young adults.
  4. The hospital survival rate of students who experience SCA in a school with an AED is approximately 70%.
  5. The hospital survival rate of students who experience SCA in a school without an AED is approximately 8%.
  6. Student-athletes are more than 2 times as likely to die from SCA than non-athletes.
  7. 66% of the deaths caused by SCA in children occur during regular exercise.
  8. SCA caused by commotio cordis is the most common cause of traumatic death in youth baseball.
  9. Survival decreases an astounding 10% every minute until a defibrillator shock is applied.
  10. SCA in young people can be caused by Long QT Syndrome, commotio cordis, or congenital heart disease.

Sources: American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, Resuscitation Journal, Close the Gap, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, National Institute of Health, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

How to Run an Effective AED Drill: Create, Practice, and Review.

Developing and running effective AED drills are an essential part of your school’s emergency plan. Because the single most important contributing factor for survival of SCA is minimizing the time from collapse to defibrillation —  survival decreases an astounding 10% every minute until a shock is applied — knowing what to do and how to do it quickly may save a life of a student, parent, or school employee.

Regularly scheduled drills can test your team and your student body’s readiness and their ability to act quickly and to respond appropriately in the event of a cardiac emergency.

The Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation’s publication Saving Lives in Schools and Sports recommends developing and conducting practice drills for your cardiac Emergency Action Plan (EAP); it’s the best way to make sure it works! Then, once you’ve executed your drill, be sure that you conduct a detailed post-drill review so you and your team can make changes based on real-life scenarios.

Planning Your AED Drill

Here’s a convenient checklist for your annual or semi-annual AED drill:

  • Inform your team that you’ll be conducting a drill in the next week or two so they have an opportunity to review your EAP.
  • Make sure your staff is trained in adult, child, and infant CPR.
  • Choose a scenario that fits your setting.
  • Designate an observer/proctor to administer the drill.
  • Develop a drill worksheet (this worksheet should include the scenario for the drill, the time the drill commenced, when the victim was found, time the rescuer called 911, when chest compressions started, when other bystanders arrived on the scene, when the AED arrived on the scene, when AED training pads were applied, and the names of each individual performing the actions).
  • You’ll need an appropriately-sized CPR Manikin, AED trainer, AED, and a timing device.

Day of AED Drill

On the day of your school’s AED drill, your designated observer will place the CPR manikin in an appropriate, visible location. As soon as the manikin has been observed and someone has activated the EAP, the observer should note the time and read the scenario to the responders.

As soon as the responders have obtained the AED from its usual location, the observer should hand the rescuers the AED trainer to continue the drill (if possible, ask an assistant to return the emergency-ready AED to its clearly marked and accessible location). Do not use your emergency-ready AED for the drill! During this time the observer will record times and responses. If possible, the observer should take a video recording of the drill for post-drill evaluation.  

After Drill Review

First, congratulate your team on a job well done! Then give everyone some time to process and think about their part in the drill. After everyone has had a day to think about how things went, bring your staff members together for a detailed analysis of your AED drill. Ask your educators what they thought went well. If possible, review the video of the drill. Ask your observer to note what the rescuers did right and what they could have been done better. Consider which parts of the drill went smoothly and which parts were more challenging.

If you make changes to your emergency action plan, be sure to communicate those changes and schedule another drill for later in the school year!

For more information about AED packages for your school or AED and CPR training, call the team at Cardio Partners and AED.com at 866-349-4362 or email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

 

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