Bleeding Control in the Workplace

Bleeding control kits are critical in schools and public venues, but bleeding control kits in the workplace are important, too.

On-the-job traumatic injuries are incredibly common. Accidents happen! They can be caused by motor vehicle crashes or construction, assembly line, large equipment, or other industrial or agricultural accidents. 

According to the Journal of Workplace Health and Safety, “Uncontrolled blood loss is a primary source of preventable death after injury. Workplace injuries and fatalities are common, with most occurring in the agricultural/fishing/forestry/hunting or transportation/warehousing industries.” 

The risk of traumatic injury is especially high for young workers. The CDC reports that traumatic injuries are often the result of hazards present in the workplace such as sharp knives in restaurant kitchens or slippery floors in recently cleaned restrooms. Limited work experience and lack of mandated safety training are also factors. Workers of middle and high school age are especially vulnerable to workplace injuries.

Finally, the most recent traumatic injury data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows 5,280 fatal injuries in 2018. With 453 homicides in the workplace in 2018, violence presents another potential bleeding risk.

How Many Stop the Bleed Kits Does Your Workplace Need?

That’s a hard question to answer and unfortunately, there are no state or federal guidelines to mandate the number of bleeding control kits employers or organizations should have available. Some states, like Texas, are starting to implement bleeding control legislation and we hope that these laws will soon offer official guidance about how many bleeding control kits your workplace needs.

However, it’s far better to have something than nothing at all! You’ll want to consider what’s appropriate for a given situation. It’s important to think about why you’re purchasing bleeding control kits, what you hope to accomplish with them, and how many people may need them. Ideally, you should have at least one kit for every 10 employees.

We encourage people to think of these kits as a type of insurance — we hope we never need to use it, but we’re glad we have it if we need it! 

Best Practices and Recommendations for Workplace Bleeding Control

  • Clearly communicate emergency protocols and procedures.
  • Install clearly-marked wall-mounted trauma kits next to publically accessible AED cabinets and first aid kits.
  • Equip company-owned vehicles with a first aid and a bleeding control kit.
  • Multiple and readily accessible bleeding control kits are essential for corporate environments, industrial environments, farms, warehouses, factories, commercial kitchens, and construction worksites.
  • Although anyone can use a bleeding control kit, it’s important to offer your employees company-sponsored first aid and Stop the Bleed® training sessions.
  • Require building security team members to carry bleeding control kits and receive Stop the Bleed®, CPR, AED, and first aid training.
  • Mandate industry-specific safety training at regular intervals.

For more information about the importance of bleeding control kits in the workplace or to receive a free consultation, give us a call at 866-349-4363, visit our website, or download our free Bleeding Control Resource Guide

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs is intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.

Bleeding Control Legislation

Just as many states have adopted AED legislation, more and more states are considering legislation to require certain businesses and organizations to install bleeding control kits in public buildings.

Here at Cardio Partners, we think this is incredibly important work! 

Texas Takes the Legislative Lead

As of January 1, 2020, Texas school districts were required to have bleeding control stations on every public school campus as part of the state’s new Stop the Bleed© law. 

House Bill 496, authored by State Representative Barbara Gervin-Hawkins, of San Antonio, mandates that bleeding control stations must be stored in easily accessible areas of the campus and security planning protocols must also include their use. 

Students in grade seven and higher will receive training every year on how to use a bleeding control station.

According to the legislation, each Texas school’s bleeding control station is required to have: tourniquets, chest seals, compression bandages, bleeding control bandages, space emergency blankets, latex-free gloves, markers, scissors and instructional documents developed by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) or the U.S. Department of Homeland Security detailing ways to prevent blood loss after a traumatic event. 

To purchase a multipack bleeding control kit for your Texas school, visit AED.com.

States Considering Bleeding Control Legislation

The ACS supports bleeding control legislation by working with elected officials to introduce legislation mandating the installation of bleeding control kits in public buildings. The ACS recently reported that seven states are considering legislation that would place bleeding control kits in public schools or other government facilities. 

The states currently considering bleeding control legislation are:

  • California
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Missouri
  • North Carolina
  • New York 
  • Tennessee

Some states are even considering legislation that would require public schools to administer Stop the Bleed© training for students and staff. Such legislation would, of course, set the stage for future legislation to provide funding for bleeding control kits.

States that have introduced bills that would require public schools to administer bleeding control training include:

  • Arkansas
  • Missouri
  • Massachusetts
  • North Carolina

Federal Bleeding Control Legislation

Last year, the House introduced H.R.2550, the “Prevent Blood Loss with Emergency Equipment Devices Act of 2019 or the Prevent BLEEDing Act of 2019.” 

According to Congress.gov, the bill would authorize the use of Department of Homeland Security (DHS) grant funds for certain anti-blood loss purposes such as:

  • to purchase or distribute anti-blood loss supplies (tourniquets, gauze, dressings, or other appropriate materials) for use in medical emergencies in places where people gather;
  • to provide training on the proper use of anti-blood loss supplies to enhance public safety; or
  • to make grants to an eligible entity for such purposes.

And on February 27, 2020, The Senate introduced S.3346, “Prevent BLEEDing Act of 2020.” The bill would “To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the use of Homeland Security Grant Program funds for anti-blood loss purposes, and for other purposes” (Congress.gov).

Although neither bill has passed to become law, we’re encouraged to see support for bleeding control kits at the Federal level.

For more information on funding your bleeding control training or finding the right bleeding control kit for your school or organization, visit our website or download our free Bleeding Control Resource Guide

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs is intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.

Choosing the Right Stop the Bleed Kit

Just like having a publically accessible AED and First Aid kit can help save lives, so can the right Stop the Bleed© kit. Stop the Bleed© bleeding control kits are an important addition to workplace and public access emergency readiness programs. For households or farmsteads in rural, remote, or hard-to-reach locations, they make great additions to personal-use emergency kits.

What’s the difference between a Stop the Bleed© kid and a first aid kit? Find out here!

Why Choosing the Right Stop the Bleed Kit is So Important

Did you know that victims of severe bleeding can die within 5-10 minutes and that in 2019 there were more than 400 mass shootings in the United States? Or, that in 2018, 39,404 people died in motor vehicle crashes and that more than 5,000 fatal injuries would be reported in the workplace?

Get this: according to the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, approximately 5 million people die every year around the world from accidental and non-accidental trauma. And trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans 45 and younger and it’s the fourth leading cause of death overall for all ages. 

Shockingly, ABC News found that as many as one in five trauma victims may die needlessly. 

Why is choosing the right Stop the Bleed© kit so important? Because bleeding control kits save lives.

What’s in a Stop the Bleed Kit?

Bleeding control kits like the Curaplex Stop the Bleed© Kit are designed to provide the user — either emergency responders or civilians — with immediate access to life-saving products that can control bleeding and traumatic hemorrhaging.

What’s in a Basic Stop the Bleed© Kit (and how to use it)

Permanent marker: Help first responders and ER doctors by noting the time the tourniquet was applied.

Gloves offer the wearer and the victim protection from infection and bloodborne pathogens. 

Trauma shears help rescuers access the site of injury quickly and cleanly.

Tourniquets are perhaps the most important component of a bleeding control kit and, when properly applied, help stem arterial bleeding in extremities.  

Compressed gauze dressing enables rescuers to pack wounds and slow bleeding.

Emergency bandage helps to hold dressings in place to stem bleeding.

Intermediate and advanced kits typically include chest seals to treat sucking chest wounds and QuikClot dressings — which are treated with hemostatic agents for improved performance.

Finding the Right Stop the Bleed Kit?

There are three different types of Stop the Bleed© kits: basic, intermediate, and advanced. Each vacuum-sealed and tamper-proof kit contains:

Basic Curaplex Stop the Bleed©® Kit*: 

  • 1 Permanent marker
  • 2 Pair of gloves, latex-free, LG
  • 1 C-A-T® tourniquet
  • 1 Emergency bandage
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 7.5″
  • 2 Rolls of primed, compressed gauze dressing

Intermediate Curaplex Stop the Bleed©® Kit*:

  • 1 Permanent marker
  • 2 Pair of gloves, latex-free, LG
  • 1 C-A-T® tourniquet
  • 1 Emergency bandage
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 7.5″
  • 1 Roll of primed, compressed gauze dressing
  • 1 Pack of H*VENT chest seals (2/pk)

Advanced Curaplex Stop the Bleed©® Kit*:

  • 1 Permanent marker 
  • 2 Pair of gloves, latex-free, LG
  • 1 SWAT-T Tourniquet (Orange)
  • 1 QuikClot bleeding control dressing, Roll (3″x 4′)
  • 1 H*Vent vented chest seal, two-pack
  • 1 Emergency bandage 4″
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 5.5″
  • 1 S-Folded primed, compressed gauze dressing

*Contents may vary depending on kit model

For more information on Stop the Bleed© kits and to find the bleeding control kit that’s right for you, visit our website or download our free Bleeding Control Resource Guide.

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs is intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.