What’s the Difference Between a First Aid Kit and Bleeding Control Kit?

It’s important to recognize that although both types of kits are potentially life-saving, there are key differences between a first aid kit and a bleeding control kit. Let us be clear: they are not interchangeable!

  • First aid kits can be used to treat minor injuries like scrapes, minor cuts, burns, and sprains.
  • Bleeding control kits are designed to help control life-threatening bleeding caused by gunshot wounds, motor vehicle accidents, industrial accidents, or stabbing.

In this post, we’ll discuss the differences between a first aid kit and a bleeding control kit, what’s included in them, and who should own a bleeding control kit.

What’s kind of injuries can a first aid kit help treat?

A well-equipped, compact first aid kit should contain everything you need to handle minor injuries — like scrapes, abrasions, and minor cuts. They can even help bystanders treat moderate, non-life threatening injuries such as sprains, frostbites, burns, and deeper cuts. 

First aid kits generally contain antibacterial wipes, band-aids, aspirin, hydrocortisone ointment, antibacterial ointment, burn gel, surgical tape, gauze, and cold packs. Anyone and we think that everyone — teachers, parents, office managers, recreation leaders, coaches, babysitters, friends, neighbors — should be first aid certified and they should all have quick access to a first aid kit!

While incredibly useful, first aid kits are not designed to stop life-threatening bleeding.

What’s kind of injuries can a bleeding control kit help treat?

Bleeding control kits — also referred to as trauma kits or Stop the Bleed® kits — are specialized trauma kits designed to provide professional first responders or bystanders with the products they need to stop life-threatening bleeding. 

Bleeding control kits can help control excessive bleeding caused by gunshot wounds, stabbing, or crushing. These specialized kits are specifically designed to stop heavy bleeding and hemorrhaging and cannot treat burns, frostbite, or minor cuts and abrasions.

What’s Inside a Bleeding Control Kit?

Bleeding control kits — such as Curaplex Stop the Bleed Kits —  are designed to provide the user with immediate access to life-saving products that can control bleeding and traumatic hemorrhaging.

Each vacuum-sealed and tamper-proof kit contains:

Basic Curaplex Stop the Bleed® Kit*: 

  • 1 Permanent marker
  • 2 Pair of gloves, latex-free, size: large
  • 1 SAM® XT Extremity Tourniquet
  • 1 Emergency Bandage
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 7.5in
  • 2 Rolls of primed, compressed gauze dressing
  • 1 Instructions for use sheet

Intermediate Curaplex Stop the Bleed® Kit*:

  • 1 Permanent marker
  • 2 Pair of gloves, latex-free, size: large
  • 1 SAM® XT Extremity Tourniquet
  • 1 Emergency Bandage
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 7.5in
  • 2 Rolls of primed, compressed gauze dressing
  • 1 Instructions for use sheet
  • 1 Pack H*VENT Vented Chest Seals (2/pk)

Advanced Curaplex Stop the Bleed® Kit*:

  • 1 Permanent marker (2) Pair of gloves, latex-free, LG
  • 1 SWAT-T Tourniquet (Orange)
  • 1 Quickclot bleeding control dressing, Roll (3″x 4′)
  • 1 H*Vent vented chest seal, two-pack
  • 1 Emergency bandage 4″
  • 1 Pair of trauma shears, 5.5″
  • 1 S-Folded primed, compressed gauze dressing

*Contents may vary depending on kit model

Who Should Own a Bleeding Control Kit?

Here at Cardio Partners, we think that everyone who needs a first aid kit — that is, everyone — should also have a bleeding control kit! 

Bleeding control kits can be used to rescue individuals injured in motorcycle accidents, hikers injured in remote locations, workers injured on an assembly line, or victims of violent crime. Sadly, more and more kits are needed in public spaces like parks, schools, office buildings, municipal buildings, and other public venues to treat victims of mass casualty events and active shooter incidents.

Mass casualty incidents such as mass shootings are a harrowing fact of life in America. Uncontrolled bleeding is responsible for 35% of pre-hospital trauma deaths and 40% of deaths within the first 24 hours (National Institute of Health). 

Bleeding control kits provide rescuers and bystanders with immediate access to the products they need to save lives. 

For pricing on bleeding control kits, call our team at 866-349-4362 or visit AED.com for more information.

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs is intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.

What is Hands-Only CPR?

Hands-only CPR (also known as compression-only CPR) is CPR without rescue breaths. The American Heart Association has noted that “Hands-only CPR carried out by a bystander has been shown to be as effective as CPR with breaths in the first few minutes during an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest for an adult victim.”

With COVID-19 gaining global traction, Hands-Only CPR is a smart move. 

Hands-Only CPR is an easy-to-learn first aid technique that helps keep victims of a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) or other medical emergencies alive until medical professionals can take over. The life-saving technique keeps blood (and therefore oxygen) pumping through the victim’s body. Oxygen is needed to maintain brain and vital organ function. 

How to Perform Hands-Only CPR

Step 1: Make sure the scene is safe and firmly tap the person on the shoulder. In a loud, clear voice, ask them if they’re OK. Look for signs of rhythmic, normal breathing.

Step 2: If the victim isn’t responsive, call 911 or ask another bystander to do so. If possible, ask a bystander to locate an AED.

Step 3: If the person remains unresponsive, kneel beside them and position your body so that your shoulders are directly over your hands, keeping your arms straight.

Step 4: Begin Hands-only CPR by placing the heel of one hand on the center of the chest.

Step 5: Place the heel of your other hand on top of the first hand, then lace your fingers together.

Step 6: Push hard, push fast. Use your body weight to help you administer compressions that are at least two inches deep and delivered at a rate of at least 100-120 compressions per minute. Be sure to let the victim’s chest rise completely between compressions.

Step 7: Continue Hands-Only CPR until you see obvious signs of life, an AED becomes available, you become too fatigued to continue, or until another trained responder or EMS professional can take over. Discontinue CPR if the scene becomes too unsafe for you to continue.

(SOURCE: American Red Cross)

Who can perform Hands-Only CPR

You can. It’s true, anyone can learn Hands-Only CPR. What will you learn in a CPR or First Aid class? Plenty! Courses cover adult, child, and infant CPR, multiple-rescuer CPR, common emergency scenarios, and so much more.  

Many organizations offer “blended” courses, which enable good samaritans like yourself to complete the text-based portion of the course online at your own pace and convenience. Once you’ve passed the online course, a focused hands-on skills workshop rounds out the training. 

For more information on purchasing an AED, CPR and AED Training call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.

Cardio Partners is a Proud Supporter of Project Adam

What is Project Adam?

Project ADAM was founded in 1999, after the death of 17-year-old Adam Lemel. Adam, an accomplished athlete from Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin, collapsed and died after experiencing a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). The irregular heartbeat which led to his death — in his case, ventricular fibrillation — could have been shocked into a normal rhythm with defibrillation. 

An AED could have saved his life.

Soon after his death, Adam’s parents, Patty Lemel-Clanton and Joe Lemel, collaborated with the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin’s Herma Heart Center to found the nonprofit organization, Project Adam, in his honor. Project ADAM affiliates provide the foundation for schools to plan and develop their AED program. Support includes AED program planning templates, reference manuals, and one-on-one consultation on how to help prevent sudden cardiac death in the school setting.

In 2017, historic Project ADAM AED program management legislation passed in Tennessee. The new laws paved the way for proper placement of AEDs in schools, AED and CPR training, and AED drills to test school response systems. Other states soon followed suit.

Today, Project ADAM is a part of children’s hospitals and schools across the country supporting Heart Safe School initiatives. More than 20 states have adopted Project Adam Programming. Project Adam outreach has helped save the lives of children and adults all over the country.

How Common is SCA in children and young adults?

Although rare, SCA claims the lives of an estimated 6,000-8,000 individuals under the age of 35 each year (Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation).  Commotio cordis — often caused by a sudden blow to the chest — is the leading cause of SCA in student-athletes. Other causes of sudden cardiac death in children include Long QT Syndrome, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), and other congenital abnormalities.

While a vast majority of the more than 356,000 cardiac arrests that are recorded each year occur in adults over the age of 35 who suffer from coronary artery disease, these numbers are still something to be concerned about. The Mayo Clinic estimates that perhaps 1 in every 50,000 SCA deaths a year occurs in young athletes — like Adam Lemel.

Together, Project ADAM and Cardio Partners are making a difference in hospitals, schools, and communities across the nation.

For more information about the importance of AEDs in Schools and reasons why you should sign up for AED and CPR training, visit our blog. To learn more about our AED packages for schools or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com. Calls are welcome, too! Give Cardio Partners a ring at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.