Cardio Partners is a Proud Supporter of Project Adam

What is Project Adam?

Project ADAM was founded in 1999, after the death of 17-year-old Adam Lemel. Adam, an accomplished athlete from Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin, collapsed and died after experiencing a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). The irregular heartbeat which led to his death — in his case, ventricular fibrillation — could have been shocked into a normal rhythm with defibrillation. 

An AED could have saved his life.

Soon after his death, Adam’s parents, Patty Lemel-Clanton and Joe Lemel, collaborated with the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin’s Herma Heart Center to found the nonprofit organization, Project Adam, in his honor. Project ADAM affiliates provide the foundation for schools to plan and develop their AED program. Support includes AED program planning templates, reference manuals, and one-on-one consultation on how to help prevent sudden cardiac death in the school setting.

In 2017, historic Project ADAM AED program management legislation passed in Tennessee. The new laws paved the way for proper placement of AEDs in schools, AED and CPR training, and AED drills to test school response systems. Other states soon followed suit.

Today, Project ADAM is a part of children’s hospitals and schools across the country supporting Heart Safe School initiatives. More than 20 states have adopted Project Adam Programming. Project Adam outreach has helped save the lives of children and adults all over the country.

How Common is SCA in children and young adults?

Although rare, SCA claims the lives of an estimated 6,000-8,000 individuals under the age of 35 each year (Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation).  Commotio cordis — often caused by a sudden blow to the chest — is the leading cause of SCA in student-athletes. Other causes of sudden cardiac death in children include Long QT Syndrome, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), and other congenital abnormalities.

While a vast majority of the more than 356,000 cardiac arrests that are recorded each year occur in adults over the age of 35 who suffer from coronary artery disease, these numbers are still something to be concerned about. The Mayo Clinic estimates that perhaps 1 in every 50,000 SCA deaths a year occurs in young athletes — like Adam Lemel.

Together, Project ADAM and Cardio Partners are making a difference in hospitals, schools, and communities across the nation.

For more information about the importance of AEDs in Schools and reasons why you should sign up for AED and CPR training, visit our blog. To learn more about our AED packages for schools or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com. Calls are welcome, too! Give Cardio Partners a ring at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.

Who Should be Trained in CPR at a Dentist’s Office?

Whether you’re reviewing your existing AED program or you’re just starting to implement one, an important question to consider is who should be trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at a dentist’s office. 

Training is one of the most important components of a successful AED program. And managing sudden cardiac arrest in dental practices is incredibly important. 

Fortunately, licensing boards in nearly every state require that dentists and dental hygienists to maintaining a current CPR or Basic Life Support (BLS) certification. 

ADA Training Recommendations

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) “Dentists, through their academic, clinical and continuing education, should be familiar with the prevention, diagnosis, and management of common emergencies. In addition, they should provide appropriate training to their staff so that each person knows what to do and can act promptly.”

The ADA also recommends annual reviews and suggests conducting mock emergencies to help your staff become more confident in their roles when a real emergency occurs. 

State Requirement for CPR Training in Dental Offices

AED and CPR legislation varies widely from state to state. Over 20 states have legislation regarding the use of AEDs in dental offices but only a handful of states such as Arizona, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, Tennessee, and Texas, require CPR training or Basic Life Support (BLS) certification. 

Cardiac Partners’ CPR Recommendations for Dentists

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but we think everyone who works in your dental practice should be first aid, CPR, and AED certified. According to the American Heart Association, more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur each year and nearly 90% of people who experience SCA die. However, when confidently and quickly performed, CPR can dramatically improve survival odds.

Is Your Dental Team Ready to Respond to Cardiac Arrest?

Dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and other team members must be prepared to respond to patients who experience cardiac arrest. In addition to a well-rehearsed emergency response plan, dentists should invest in a fully-stocked AED dental package that includes:

  • AED wall cabinet
  • AED
  • Adult and pediatric pads
  • AED Case
  • Spare AED battery
  • Rescue ready kit
  • AED Decal and signage
  • Check tag

To learn more about our AED packages for dental offices or to purchase an AED, visit AED.com or call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.

Managing Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Dental Practices

There are more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) annually in the U.S. and nearly 90% of them are fatal, is your dental practice ready to manage a sudden cardiac arrest? 

According to the American Dental Association (ADA), dental teams should be trained and adequately equipped to provide an immediate and coordinated emergency response for patients experiencing a medical emergency such as chest pain or sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

Is Your Dental Team Prepared to Manage Cardiac Arrest?

Dental team members must be prepared to handle a medical emergency. Your office should have a well-rehearsed emergency response plan as well as a fully-stocked AED dental package that includes:

  • AED wall cabinet
  • AED
  • Adult and pediatric pads
  • AED Case
  • Spare AED battery
  • Rescue ready kit
  • AED Decal and signage
  • Check tag

Know the Difference Between Chest Pain and SCA

The primary difference between chest pain and cardiac arrest is that a patient experiencing chest pain will almost always remain conscious. Take note: chest pain can quickly progress into arrhythmias, which can lead to sudden cardiac arrest.

It’s also important to remember, however, that SCA can occur to anyone at any time and may not be preceded by chest pain.

What to Do if a Dental Patient Experiences Chest Pain or SCA

If your patient begins to complain of chest pain, call for help immediately. Make sure the patient is as comfortable as possible. Keep them talking! If they’re talking, you know their airway is clear and there’s enough oxygen to support blood flow throughout the body. 

Decisions in Dentistry, a peer-reviewed journal, recommends following these steps when a patient complains of chest pain:

0716-arrest-6

During cardiac arrest, the heart is unable to pump enough blood and oxygen to the body. Without oxygen, a patient will quickly lose consciousness and become unresponsive. 

Follow these steps if one of your patients is experiencing cardiac arrest:

  • Call 911
  • Ask a colleague to retrieve the AED
  • Place patient on a firm surface in a supine position
  • Begin chest compressions at 120 compressions per minute
  • Provide rescue breathing or oxygen
  • Turn on AED and follow prompts
  • Continue CPR and follow the AED prompts until EMS arrives

Best Practices for AED Program Management in Dental Offices

Keep Your AEDs in Plain Sight

If your dental office has an AED, make sure it’s easily accessible and in plain sight. If you don’t have an AED, you should purchase one immediately! Larger practices should consider having more than one AED. Remember, timing is critical when it comes to administering CPR or defibrillation. For every minute that passes without CPR or defibrillation, the chance of survival decreases 7-10% (American Heart Association).

Invest in an AED Compliance Management System

Make sure that your AEDs are in compliance and are emergency-ready with a user-friendly AED Compliance Management System. Online systems such as Cardio Partners’ Premium AED Compliance Management System ensure that your equipment is properly registered, checked, logged, and that your physician’s prescription is up-to-date. These systems can also help you track the expiration dates of your defibrillators’ batteries and pads.

Make Sure Your Entire Staff is BLS Certified

Every two years, dental team members should receive comprehensive training on basic life saving techniques. This helps ensure that everyone is prepared to perform these lifesaving duties when called upon. So keep your BLS certifications up-to-date and make sure each and every staff member is first aid and CPR certified!

Know the Drill

Regularly discuss your emergency management plan and your procedures for handling cardiac arrest with your team members. Schedule regular reviews of your emergency plan so your team is ready to respond in the event of an emergency.  

For more information about managing sudden cardiac arrest in your dental practice, call Cardio Partners at 866-349-4362. You can also email us at customerservice@cardiopartners.com.

DISCLAIMER: Information and resources found on the cardiopartners.com and aed.com websites/blogs is intended to educate, inform, and motivate readers to make their health and wellness decisions after consulting with their healthcare provider. The authors are not healthcare providers. NO information on this site should be used to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease or condition.

DISCLAIMER: The information included in this post and on our website is not intended as legal advice. As legislation changes often, this post may inadvertently contain inaccurate or incomplete information. We urge you to contact your state representative should you require more information about current AED, CPR, and Good Samaritan laws in your state.